USS Thresher
Wednesday, April 10, 2019
Contact Dr. Allan Kerr

on the morning of 10 April 1963, USS THRESHER (SSN-593), less than two years old and the lead boat in a new class of nuclear-powered, fast-attack submarines, began deep-diving tests about 200 miles to the east of Cape Cod, MA. The submarine-rescue ship USS SKYLARK (ASR-20) stood by overhead. At 0903 SKYLARK received a garbled transmission over the underwater telephone: THRESHER reported “Experiencing minor difficulties. …Have positive up angle…attempting to blow.” But THRESHER and the 129 men she carried—including 17 civilians—never returned to the surface.
There are a total of 9 nuclear submarine ship wrecks in the world.
Two from the US Navy, USS Thresher and USS Scorpion. Five from the Soviet Union, and two from Russia.
For the US Navy, the Thresher disaster had one positive outcome with the formation of SUBSAFE. This construction and crew safety program has enabled American submarines to be the safest in the world.

Read more about the loss of the Thresher, and her discovery.

Location Kittery, ME
Thresher Memorial Project Group
USS Thresher

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