Andrew Groocock Pic Port Houston 1860s

the reason we are all here: A historical view of buffalo bayou
Presented by andrew groocock

Tuesday, January 22, 2019
6:00 - 7:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

REGISTER

ABOUT

In a city that is visually dominated by automobiles and freeways, very few Houstonians realize that the reason for their city’s existence and prosperity is the waterway of Buffalo Bayou. Houston truly is “the town which built the port which built the city.” We live at a time when Houstonians are actively developing an appreciation of the bayou upon which their city was founded, an appreciation that can be greatly enhanced by looking at Buffalo Bayou in a historical context. By understanding this history, we are able to reconnect with the city’s strong connection to the water and ensure its protection for generations to come.In a city that is visually dominated by automobiles and freeways, very few Houstonians realize that the reason for their city’s existence and prosperity is the waterway of Buffalo Bayou. Houston truly is “the town which built the port which built the city.” We live at a time when Houstonians are actively developing an appreciation of the bayou upon which their city was founded, an appreciation that can be greatly enhanced by looking at Buffalo Bayou in a historical context. By understanding this history, we are able to reconnect with the city’s strong connection to the water and ensure its protection for generations to come.

Andrew Groocock is originally from England, but has lived in Houston for more than 30 years and considers himself a Houstonian. He is a practicing artist, docent at The Museum of Fine Arts, and Houston tour guide. Andrew served as president of The Professional Tour Guide Association of Houston from 2014-2016 and, since 2015, has been a guide on the historical boat tours offered by The Buffalo Bayou Partnership. In 2017, he developed the historical boat tour “From Port to Port” for The Buffalo Bayou Partnership which highlights the history of Buffalo Bayou from Allen’s Landing to the Port of Houston.

LOCATION

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

Nell Wheeler Pic Harvestingedit

rainwater wrangling: modern solutions for an ancient practice
Presented by nell wheeler

Saturday, April 27, 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Human settlements have been collecting and storing rain water for centuries. Around the world, cisterns were built into the floors and rooftops of houses with the water being used for dry-land farming, irrigation, and drinking. Now, as our water needs grow to an all-time high, rainwater harvesting provides an easy and affordable solution. From the bustle of downtown Houston to the quiet plains of West Texas, communities are promoting and advancing the ancient, sustainable practice. The presentation will discuss the reasons to collect rain, steps for how to harvest and store it, and the best ways to use collected rainwater, whether for a home garden, agricultural use, or commercial landscaping.  Human settlements have been collecting and storing rain water for centuries. Around the world, cisterns were built into the floors and rooftops of houses with the water being used for dry-land farming, irrigation, and drinking. Now, as our water needs grow to an all-time high, rainwater harvesting provides an easy and affordable solution. From the bustle of downtown Houston to the quiet plains of West Texas, communities are promoting and advancing the ancient, sustainable practice. The presentation will discuss the reasons to collect rain, steps for how to harvest and store it, and the best ways to use collected rainwater, whether for a home garden, agricultural use, or commercial landscaping.

Nell Wheeler has been designing and installing rainwater collection systems around Texas for over fifteen years, using skills she learned working as a plumber in commercial new construction. Together with her husband, Nell owns Metal Rain Tanks, LLC, where they build and install stainless steel tanks for collecting rainwater. Projects include residential and small commercial rainwater collection for irrigation, as well as using rainwater tanks for storm water detention. They also ship tanks across the country, which are collecting water from Seattle to San Juan. An avid gardener and woodturner, Nell is also one of the very few female Master Plumbers in Texas.

LOCATION

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

WestfieldExplosioncrop

"A formidable looking pile of iron boilers and machinery": reconstrucTing the civil war gunboat uss westfield
PRESENTED BY justin parkoff, ph.d.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Houston Maritime Museum

ABOUT

USS Westfield belonged to an unusual class of civilian vessels that the Navy converted during the American Civil War to serve in the Union’s blockade of Confederate southern ports. Originally built and operated as a double-ended ferryboat, the vessel was purchased by the Navy from the New York Staten Island ferry service. Westfield served as the flagship for the West Gulf Blockading Squadron’s operations along the Texas Gulf Coast. The vessel last saw action in 1863 at the Battle of Galveston where it ran aground and was blown up by its crew to keep the vessel out of Confederate hands. In 2009, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) orchestrated Westfield’s recovery in advance of their operations to deepen the Texas City Channel. Archaeologists recovered approximately 8,000 artifacts during the salvage operation including a 9” smoothbore Dahlgren cannon. The USACE sent these artifacts to the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University where the artifacts underwent conservation and study. In May, 2014, the Houston Maritime Museum hosted a presentation on the Westfield during the conservation phase of the project. Now complete, this follow up presentation will describe the seven year project and how numerous components of the vessel were physically reconstructed and placed on permanent display at the Texas City Museum.

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