Andrew Groocock Pic Port Houston 1860s

the reason we are all here: A historical view of buffalo bayou
Presented by andrew groocock

Tuesday, January 22, 2019
6:00 - 7:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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ABOUT

In a city that is visually dominated by automobiles and freeways, very few Houstonians realize that the reason for their city’s existence and prosperity is the waterway of Buffalo Bayou. Houston truly is “the town which built the port which built the city.” We live at a time when Houstonians are actively developing an appreciation of the bayou upon which their city was founded, an appreciation that can be greatly enhanced by looking at Buffalo Bayou in a historical context. By understanding this history, we are able to reconnect with the city’s strong connection to the water and ensure its protection for generations to come.In a city that is visually dominated by automobiles and freeways, very few Houstonians realize that the reason for their city’s existence and prosperity is the waterway of Buffalo Bayou. Houston truly is “the town which built the port which built the city.” We live at a time when Houstonians are actively developing an appreciation of the bayou upon which their city was founded, an appreciation that can be greatly enhanced by looking at Buffalo Bayou in a historical context. By understanding this history, we are able to reconnect with the city’s strong connection to the water and ensure its protection for generations to come.

Andrew Groocock is originally from England, but has lived in Houston for more than 30 years and considers himself a Houstonian. He is a practicing artist, docent at The Museum of Fine Arts, and Houston tour guide. Andrew served as president of The Professional Tour Guide Association of Houston from 2014-2016 and, since 2015, has been a guide on the historical boat tours offered by The Buffalo Bayou Partnership. In 2017, he developed the historical boat tour “From Port to Port” for The Buffalo Bayou Partnership which highlights the history of Buffalo Bayou from Allen’s Landing to the Port of Houston.

LOCATION

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

Nell Wheeler Pic Harvestingedit

rainwater wrangling: modern solutions for an ancient practice
Presented by nell wheeler

Saturday, April 27, 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Human settlements have been collecting and storing rain water for centuries. Around the world, cisterns were built into the floors and rooftops of houses with the water being used for dry-land farming, irrigation, and drinking. Now, as our water needs grow to an all-time high, rainwater harvesting provides an easy and affordable solution. From the bustle of downtown Houston to the quiet plains of West Texas, communities are promoting and advancing the ancient, sustainable practice. The presentation will discuss the reasons to collect rain, steps for how to harvest and store it, and the best ways to use collected rainwater, whether for a home garden, agricultural use, or commercial landscaping.  Human settlements have been collecting and storing rain water for centuries. Around the world, cisterns were built into the floors and rooftops of houses with the water being used for dry-land farming, irrigation, and drinking. Now, as our water needs grow to an all-time high, rainwater harvesting provides an easy and affordable solution. From the bustle of downtown Houston to the quiet plains of West Texas, communities are promoting and advancing the ancient, sustainable practice. The presentation will discuss the reasons to collect rain, steps for how to harvest and store it, and the best ways to use collected rainwater, whether for a home garden, agricultural use, or commercial landscaping.

Nell Wheeler has been designing and installing rainwater collection systems around Texas for over fifteen years, using skills she learned working as a plumber in commercial new construction. Together with her husband, Nell owns Metal Rain Tanks, LLC, where they build and install stainless steel tanks for collecting rainwater. Projects include residential and small commercial rainwater collection for irrigation, as well as using rainwater tanks for storm water detention. They also ship tanks across the country, which are collecting water from Seattle to San Juan. An avid gardener and woodturner, Nell is also one of the very few female Master Plumbers in Texas.

LOCATION

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

8. Elmer Brown 1942 Dorie Miller in the Act of Manning the Gun during Pearl Harbor Cleveland Artists Foundation

World war ii's first hero: the story of doris miller

Presented by thomas w. cutter

Tuesday,  July 9, 2019
6:00 - 7:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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ABOUT

Doris Miller, the son of an impoverished sharecropper, was born in McLennan County, Texas. During the Depression, he took the only job that he could find: the Navy. There, in common with all black recruits, he was assigned to the messman branch, making the beds, shining the shoes, and serving the meals of white officers. In December 1941, he was assigned to the West Virginia, stationed at Pearl Harbor, when the Japanese launched its infamous attack. Although not trained in gunnery, when Miller was ordered on deck to help his wounded captain, he took over an unmanned machine gun and began to fire at the attacking planes. News of the heroic actions of this humble messman spread through the American press, making him the country’s first hero of WWII and earning for him the Navy Cross, the first ever awarded to a black man.

Thomas W. Cutrer is a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. After serving as a combat intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force, he earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas. He then worked as a curator at the University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures and as Associate Director of the Texas State Historical Association. Including his biography on Miller, he is the author and/or editor of ten books on Southern military and cultural history. He now lives in Texarkana where his wife is the president of Texas A&M University - Texarkana.

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

Abbie Grubb Pic Current Battleship

A Century of service for the "Mighty t"

Presented by dr. abbie grubb

Saturday,  July 20, 2019
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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USS Texas (BB-35) has had an illustrious career from its commissioning in March 1914 to her position in the 21st century. She served during World War I in the North Sea and escorted war convoys across the Atlantic during World War II. Texas now serves as a museum and memorial ship at the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. Beyond her military service, she has had a strong connection with the expanding role of the country in the early 20th century and been tied to technological advancements that helped shape the modern era. In addition, Texas remains a vital player as a site of public memory and national identity as America moves into the 21st century and further away from one of the most significant periods in human history.

Dr. Abbie Grubb graduated from James Madison University with a BA in History and specialization in Public History. She continued her education at Rice University and received her MA and PhD in History with a focus on 20th Century U.S. History, Military History, and Public History. While working on her graduate degrees, Dr. Grubb worked in several museums including Houston Maritime Museum and the Battleship Texas/San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. Dr. Grubb is currently an Instructor of History and the Honors Program Coordinator at San Jacinto College South Campus.

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003 

JonesAct

returning to The jones act: an updated insight

Presented by stephen c. hanemann, esq.

Tuesday, July 30, 2019
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 | REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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Hanemann returns to HMM to discuss updates and answer questions on the Jones Act. The Jones Act dates back to the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, which was largely intended to buffer the WWI’s shockwave to international trade and preserve the U.S. shipping industry. Effected into law on June 5, 1920, Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act, commonly referred to as the Jones Act, established coastwise-trade parameters for domestic cabotage: the transportation of merchandise or passengers between two U.S. points. Surviving revisions, recodification, and attempted repeal, the Jones Act has become the subject of fierce controversy. This retrospective will provide insight and timely commentary regarding the coastwise law’s application, enforcement, and future viability.

Stephen C. Hanemann, Esq., is a partner in the New Orleans office of Kean Miller LLP.  His career and passion both maintain deep roots in the maritime and shipping industry. Hanemann’s practice focuses on domestic and international trade, which requires an extensive understanding of both the Jones Act and international-cabotage regulations. He works with and provides essential elements of legal and operational support to vessel owners, exploration companies, and pipeline constructors. His professional engagements have spanned the entire U.S. coastline and to many overseas trade zones.

Houston Maritime Museum
2311 Canal Street, Suite 101 | Houston, Texas 77003