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viking masters of the northern seas: from scandinavia east, west, and south
Presented by Dr. sally vaughn


Tuesday, August 22, 2017
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Houston Maritime Museum

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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ABOUT

The Viking Age began in the 8th century, and by the 11th century, the Vikings had Scandinavianzed most of the Northern Hemisphere while leaving many questions behind in the process. Why did they leave their home? What were their main tools of expansion, exploration, and discovery? Ships? Masts? Sails? Was this time a Diaspora based on the model of the spread of Jewish 1st century dispersion and settlements? Or an Age of Discovery that shares
similarities to 15th century Portuguese and Spanish explorers, as well as the merchants and settlers who followed them? Who were these people, anyway? Raiders? Traders? Farmers? Did the Viking Age really end with the death of Magnus Barelegs, the last Viking king, in 1103? Or was it just the beginning?


Sally N. Vaughn is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Houston, Central Campus. Her main research is on St. Anselm of Canterbury’s political career as abbot of Bec in Normandy and archbishop of Canterbury in England, a story which spans the Norman Conquest of 1066, and, as part of this study, she explores the Viking background of the Normans in Northern France. She spends summers and Decembers in Copenhagen with her husband Michael H. Gelting, a Danish scholar of medieval Scandinavia.

Location

Houston Maritime Museum
2204 Dorrington St. | Houston, Texas 77030 
Parking is available in front of the museum and in the the surface lot east of the museum (Holcombe at Montclair). 

 


 Frost 
Special thanks to Frost Bank for sponsoring the hmm history lecture series. 
 

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Energy Metropolis: Growth and Environment in houston, texas
Presented by Martin v. melosi

Tuesday, September 26, 2017
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Houston Maritime Museum

$5 FOR ADULTS (12 AND UP) | FREE FOR MEMBERS, ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS & CHILDREN UNDER 12 REGISTRATION REQUIRED

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ABOUT

As an energy-intensive urban area, Houston has been shaped by natural and As an energy-intensive urban area, Houston has been shaped by natural and human factors. The city is foremost a product of the Texas Coastal Zone – flat, hot and humid, heavily vegetated, blessed with lots of water (wanted and unwanted), rich in resources, and prone to capricious weather. Oil in particular, however, shaped Houston’s modern economic and environmental history. The “energy capital of the world” has been a major player on the world’s energy stage, but petroleum refining, petrochemical production, and cheap, available gasoline have also shaped Houston in many ways. Discover how our waterways, highways, real estate market, labor force, and many pollution problems are directly attributable to our growth as an energy metropolis and what the future holds for Houston.


Martin V. Melosi is Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor of History and Founding Director of the Center for Public History at the University of Houston. He is the author or editor of 19 books and more than 100 articles and book chapters. He is known nationally and internationally for his work in environment, urban, and energy history.

Location

Houston Maritime Museum
2204 Dorrington St. | Houston, Texas 77030 
Parking is available in front of the museum and in the the surface lot east of the museum (Holcombe at Montclair). 

 

 

Veterans day WWII in the Pacific

veterans day special: WWII in the pacific
Presented by whit drake and donald m. kehn,jr.

Satruday, November 11, 2017
11:00 AM - Whit Drake Lecture | 11:45 AM - Break for refreshments | 12:15 - Don Kehn, Jr. Lecture

ABOUT

On December 7, 1941, Japan infamously coordinated an attack of Pearl Harbor. The next day newspapers from all across the country reported that the United States was officially at war. The Allied powers ultimately claimed victory; a victory that may have not seemed possible during the first few months of 1942. Join us on Veterans Day for a dual lecture as museum docent, Whit Drake, and author, Donald Kehn, delve into some of the early events of WWII in the Pacific. They will discuss how the Japanese failed despite having all the pieces in place to win the war and try to untangle the stubbornly interwoven narrative of the sinkings of the USS Pope and USS Edsall.

William (Whit) Drake is native to El Paso and joined the Air Force after graduating from Texas A&M University. After seven years flying B-52s, he came to Houston in the 70’s to work in engineering and construction at Brown and Root. Since retiring after 45 loyal years in the business, he has pursued his passion of military history by diligently researching World War II and sharing that knowledge as a docent at the Houston Maritime Museum.

Donald M. Kehn Jr. is a native Houstonian and lifetime Asiatic Fleet ‘partisan.’ He is the historian for the USS Houston Survivors Association/Next Generations group and for the Texas Commandery, Naval Order of the United States. He is the author of A Blue Sea of Blood; Deciphering the Mysterious Fate of USS Edsall, and In the Highest Degree Tragic; the Sacrifice of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet in the East Indies during WWII. 

 

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sea monsters on medieval and renaissance maps
Presented by Chet Van duzer

Tuesday, January 23, 2018
7:00 - 8:00 pm

ABOUT

What is the story behind the sea monsters seen on so many early European maps? Their first appearance can be traced back to 10th century mappaemundi and continue through the end of the 1500s. They are depicted in various forms – swimming vigorously, gamboling amid the waves, or attacking ships – and are one of the most visually engaging elements on these maps. These sea monsters are important not only in the history of cartography, art, and zoological illustration, but also in the history of the geography and of western conceptions of the ocean. They can also supply important information about the sources, influences, and methods of the cartographers who drew or painted them.

Chet Van Duzer is an NEH-Mellon Fellow at the Library of Congress and a board member of the Lazarus Project at the University of Rochester. He has published extensively on medieval and Renaissance maps in journals such as Imago Mundi, Terrae Incognitae, Word & Image, and Viator. His recent books include The World for a King: Pierre Desceliers’ Map of 1550 (2015) and Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript (2016).

 

Watch the archived footage of the lecture below.

Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

coast guard auxiliary
Presented by pat cooney

Tuesday, February 20, 2018
7:00 - 8:00 pm

 

ABOUT

The Coast Guard Auxiliary was created by Congress in 1939 to provide a uniformed volunteer force to support the United States Coast Guard. During World War II, Auxiliarists used their own boats to protect our ports and patrol our coasts from the German submarine threat. Following the war, the number of privately owned vessels exploded and the Auxiliary resumed its more traditional role of leading recreational boating safety. Over the years, the Auxiliary has continued to provide direct support as the Coast Guard has been assigned more missions with little increase in manpower or assets. Today, there are over 30,000 Coast Guard Auxiliarists supporting the Coast Guard in virtually all of its missions throughout the country.

J. Patrick Cooney has been a member of the Auxiliary for eight years and has most recently served as Commander, Division 6 of the Eighth District Coastal. The Division is composed of approximately 300 members, organized into ten Flotilla located in the Lake Charles, Beaumont, Freeport, and the greater Houston area. Cooney has practiced maritime law in Houston for many years with Royston Rayzor. He is a member of HMM’s Board of Trustees and the Board of Directors of the Houston International Seafarers Centers.